Northwest berry Foundation

Management Detail

Verticillium Wilt

in Raspberries

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Latin name: Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum

Description:

Reason for Concern:
1) Caused by a soil-borne fungus, it reduces yields by wilting, stunting, and eventually killing the fruiting cane or the entire plant.
2) Usually a cool-weather disease and most severe in poorly drained soils following cold, wet springs.

Identification/SymptomsL
Canes wilt and leaves turn yellow, then brown, and then die. Symptoms may be on only one side of the cane. If the canes are cut open, water-conducting vessels are usually reddish. Infected canes may die in one to three years. From the cane base upward, canes and leaves wilt; leaves yellow, then brown, and the cane defoliates except for a few top leaves. Symptoms may be on only one side of the cane. If canes are cut open, water-conducting vessels are usually red. Infected canes die in 1 to 3 years, and take on a bluish cast in raspberries. If canes survive winter, they may set fruit, but often collapse as fruit ripens or die before fruit matures. Symptoms on new canes frequently coincide with hot, dry mid-summer water stress. Lower leaves may be dull green as compared to bright green healthy leaves.

Disease Cycle:
Caused by a soil-borne, it is most severe in cool weather and poorly drained soils following cold, wet springs. The fungus can survive many years overwintering dormant in soil and plant debris. In prime conditions, spores germinate and penetrate roots; breaks or root wounds aid invasion. The fungus grows into water-conducting root tissue, constricts circulation, and kills the plant. The tissue decomposes and returns to soil, completing the disease cycle. Root-lesion nematode can increase disease incidence and severity.

Links:

Scouting:

  • Black raspberries are especially susceptible to this disease.
  • New canes often wilt and bluish stripes or ribbons of infected tissue may extend up the canes from the ground.
  • Leaves can wilt or take on a scorched appearance. Plants decline and eventually die.
  • Interaction with the root-lesion nematode can increase disease incidence and severity.
  • On red raspberries, the individual leaflets may fall, leaving the petiole attached to the plant.
  • Infected red raspberry canes may also have a purple or blue streak that begins near the soil line and extends upward.

 
Cultural Controls:

  • Rotations using non-susceptible grasses and cereals.
  • Avoid planting caneberries in soil where other Verticillium-susceptible crops (e.g tomatoes, hops, potatoes) were grown.
  • Use certified planting stock.
  • Select well-drained soils.

 

For information about chemical controls, check with our Pesticide Guide.

images


Verticillium wilt in raspberries - photo from Oregon State University


Verticillium wilt in black raspberries - photo from Oregon State University


Verticillium wilt in black raspberries - photo from Oregon State University

 

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Northwest Berry Foundation

Northwest Berry Foundation

© 2016

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